Finished - the Geezer Cap

Finally I've scraped together some time and a reluctant model to post my final project of 2015. The origins of this project stem from our honeymoon to NYC, in 2013. My beloved found a raffia Ben Sherman flat cap in a department store, instantly christened it the Geezer Cap and was devastated when I firmly but kindly advised him it wasn't a winner. He never forgot about it though, and often reminded me of how much he loved it and wished he'd bought it anyway and maybe I could make him a cap?? Hmmm.... no. 

Fast forward to last year when Lara made her Dad a leather flat cap using the You Sew Girl  Flat Cap pattern by Nicole Mallalieu. I made the mistake  of showing it shared it with my hatless husband, who was delighted with the find and proceeded to nag me for one over the next 6 months.



I was able to sneakily make it for him for Christmas and disguise it wrapped up inside an empty chocolate box - it's always nice to be able to surprise a loved one with exactly what they want, isn't it?


It's a great little pattern, and quite straightforward if you have confidence in sewing curves. The instructions are excellent, and if you follow the directions and markings accurately it comes together really well. The pattern is available as a PDF, and Helene stocks the paper pattern at Stitch 56.  I made a size L - not being able to measure my beloved's bonce I had to make a guess, and I used the inside of one of his bike helmets as a guide. It has come out a little big, but for a summer hat I think that's ok. I'd look at sizing down just a little if I make it again out of a tweed for winter. This version is made from a fairly heavy printed linen generously bequeathed to me by Anna. I considered interfacing it but in the end decided it would be ok. 




I lined the inside with a scrap of leftover quilting cotton that I used to make him a shirt in 2014 - I think it's a great choice, and adds a little more structure to the hat which allowed me to avoid interfacing.


It would have been a very quick project, maybe 3-4 hours, if I hadn't been a total derp and ironed the plastic brim. I know, I know - moronic. The brim is made from stencil plastic, wedged inside the fabric layers and I just didn't really think it through. So there was a bit of unpicking, angst, rage, frustration and self flagellation, but it all turned out in the end after I replaced it. I might have to have a bit of a think about what to use for a winter version. I think the plastic is a little flimsy, and my brief online research shows that professional hat makers use heavy interfacing rather than plastic.


Just to prove my love I even did a little crappy embroidery inside on the band. I'd consider making the hat band out of a different fabric if making a wool version - just to avoid an itchy head situation.



So now he's got his Geezer Cap, and it's bought me at least another 3 months before I have to start thinking about making him anything else! It's a great Dude Sewing project - lots of fun, uses hardly any fabric and looks pretty darn profesh if you ask me!


It's a bit of alright innit geezer? 

Comments

  1. or'rioght Gov! Looks fab!Very nice fabric too. My husband bought me a pattern for a mens waistcoat a couple of birthdays ago, which I considered to be a very heavy hint. So far I haven't made one as he doesn't come fabric shopping with me and doesn't like anything that I already have.....

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    1. Well that's not helpful is it? Fussy men!

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  2. Totally awesome Sarah, you are the perfect wife! Major brownie points to you x

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  3. That's brilliant! I saved the link to the pattern, but won't show this to the blokes here. I fear I would get way too many orders for the geezer cap. Perfect finishing details, love it!

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    1. Thanks Marianne! I was worried I'd have to make one for my bro and dad but fortunately it's not their style!

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  4. That looks fantastic! And I think this style really suits him - super hip, not geezer-y at all!

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  5. Does look very professional - nice!

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  6. Looks great! My husband and I both share his flat cap and its getting a bit old and manky now so this is perfect timing. 2016 is definitely going to see a bit of man sewing from me!

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    1. Ooh you'll smash it out! Make one for each of you!

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  7. Great job! I've never even considered making a hat like that - it's amazing what can be made at home once you start trying.

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  8. Puhlease don't show this to my hubby. I'll simply never hear the end, ever! It turned out so wonderfully! I really might have to kick myself in the butt and make one for my beloved.

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    1. Ooh you're a hat making legend - you'll smash it out!

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  9. Love it! you are too kind sewing for your man!

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  10. This turned out great!! And your dude looks very happy in it! I think you have to make him a lovely wool or tweed one for winter!! I love your little heart inside too!

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  11. Looks very profesh indeed! Love the story behind it, and your husband's a lucky guy!

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  12. This looks so great!! I definitely am bookmarking this for Jeremy... your guy looks so happy!! I can't wait to see one made for winter!

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  13. That lining!!!!! the little heart is just too sweet for words.

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    1. Aww thanks! I rather love using linings that are leftovers from previous garments!

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  14. Your hubs looks quite smart in his new cap! Mine loves this style as well, and I've made him 2 using one of his beloved, but utterly decrepit, old caps as a pattern. I am lucky enough to have several friends who are professional milliners, and one of them gave me some "compressed foam" to make the hat brim. I just did a quick google search, so here's an example of what it is (no affiliation!):
    https://www.judithm.com/products/flat-cap-visor
    The foam that my friend gave me was a big sheet, so I could cut out exactly the shape I needed. It made the hat brim look very professional, with enough rigidity to hold its shape, but is still flexible and pliable. And in my experience, it didn't melt under the iron! Hopefully you will find this info useful!

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    1. Oh you're wonderful! Thanks so much! Can you sew through it? I'm checking it out now!

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    2. You're so welcome!!! And yes, I believe the stuff I used was 3mm and could sew through it easily, even with my angsty machine!

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    3. I've emailed a couple of Australian millinery suppliers, and they don't stock that foam but both separately suggested Wonderflex which is a thermoplastic, or using an old fashioned ice cream container lid, which in Australia is made of a nice sturdy plastic. So many ideas! Thanks again!

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  15. This is such a sweet surprise present Sarah! It looks great, and suits him too!

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  16. That is outstanding cap. it is very good for every dashing people.
    African Wax Print, African George Fabric

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