Finished - my chambray Tyler shirt

Finally it's finished! This one has taken a good couple of weeks, and for the most part I am very pleased with my first attempt at a button down shirt! Just to recap, this is the Tyler shirt, by the newish Finnish pattern company Named. It is available in PDF only at the moment, with only 2 sizes available per pattern (34-36, 38-40, etc etc). My fitting post for this pattern can be found here but in a very quick nutshell my muslin was a size 36 but I made the bodice seams 5/8 inch to be able to french them, did a sway back adjustment, added an extra inch to each side of the centre front for better bust fit, and added a little extra to the hips. I probably really needed the size 38 in the bust and hips, but the 36 in the shoulders - my adjustments seem to have worked out ok and the shirt is very comfortable.



My fabric is this divine Robert Kaufman cotton chambray with woven dots, in indigo blue, which I purchased from Purl Soho while in NY in July on our honeymoon. I had seen it on the Purl Bee blog ages ago, and loved Laney's Archer shirt made from the same fabric, and when I found it at Purl Soho I had to snap it up - if there's one thing I love more than stripes, it's spots! The fabric is very lightweight, and the weave is quite loose (it frayed like an SOB) so it was perfect for french seams. Because I am more likely to wear the shirt with the sleeves rolled up I didn't want messy seams visible.

After reading Sunni's post at A Fashionable Stitch on the same pattern I followed her recommendation and used this Threads article to make a proper sleeve placket. It was an excellent tutorial. I'd highly recommend it, and would recommend making a dummy version as they suggested. It took me a couple of hours to make the dummy version, and then my real versions. The trickiest bit I found was getting the triangle top stitched ends to look the same.....


The pattern company does not give picture instructions and they are slightly.....hmmm. Brief is not the right word. I think they are translated from Finnish, and as such there are a couple of steps that are a little hard to follow. I did end up using some other shirt making resources on the internet, including Grainline's Archer sew-a-long, plus the Threads placket article, more just for some visuals. I constructed my shirt in a slightly different order to the instructions too - here's a step by step of what I did that may be of some assistance to others:
1 - added 5/8 inch seam allowance to the side seams, sleeve seams and back centre seam to allow for french whilst tracing pattern (in future would probably make all seam allowances 5/8 inch - see later).
2 - DID NOT DO THIS but god I wish I had (more on this later) - stay stitch neckline on front pieces, back pieces and sleeve pieces (only at the neckline).
3 - Did sleeve plackets whilst still flat.
4 - Did centre back seam (frenched), sleeve/bodice seams front and back (frenched - really had to stretch/ease pieces to be able to match them up), then sleeve and side seams all in one piece (also frenched).
5 - Did centre front button plackets and cuffs.
6 - Made collar using Andrea's FANTASTIC collar tutorial.
7 - Buttonholes and buttons.

So my major stuff up with this shirt is the neckline. As mentioned above I did not stay stitch the neckline parts and holy crap they stretched. Big time. Because this shirt is raglan sleeve there are 8 pieces that come together to make up the neckline - 8 pieces that can stretch and distort and end up adding 2 INCHES to the diameter of your neckline. When it came time to attach my collar stand I ended up having to recut 2 new collar stands and collar pieces, adding 2 inches to each. I realised then what had happened but didn't twig with how it would affect the fit. It is of course now very big around my neck, and as a result doesn't sit that well on my shoulders, and makes the sleeves too long:


I notice in these pics I'll have to put a press stud between the bust buttons too - thought I had that sorted. I don't doubt that eventually I will take the collar off and redo it - the only solution I can think of to make the neckline a little smaller is to take a tuck in the centre back at the neck line (that will take up at least an inch). I just can't be bothered unpicking my hand sewing and redoing it all right now! Is that wrong/lazy?


So the final verdict on the Tyler shirt is pretty good I think - I'm really pleased with the construction of my collar and cuff plackets for a first effort, I've improved my invisible slip stitching no end, and I've learned that if I'm easing fabric then putting the longer/bigger piece on the bottom so it is directly in contact with my machine feed dogs makes it a lot easier.... And despite my sloppy neckline and slight boobage gapage I do love my shirt!

Comments

  1. Looks Great on you! (love the fabric & buttons, too.) I'm still in the Grainline Scout Tee phase - haven't graduated to making button down shirts yet, but your post inspired me to think that I might try one before too long.
    :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks very much! The construction itself wasn't technically hard - but without those online tutorials it would have looked very handmade indeed (and not in a good way!). I say go for it - make a muslin, practice the fiddly bits and use a fabric that you like enough to wear if it's awesome, but aren't devastated to sacrifice if it's not! Thanks for coming by!

      Delete
  2. It looks great! As my non-sewing friends would say (and feel was the ultimate compliment), it looks like you bought it ;) That fabric is gorgeous - perfect match for the pattern. Thanks for including all your notes, mods and helpful tutorials - I'm planning a chambray shirt myself sometime soon, and I'll be studying up on all of those. Great job!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh such praise! Thankyou! I'm pretty chuffed with it despite my gawky neckline!

      Delete
  3. It turned out so well!!!! I really like this pattern and I'm so grateful to you for sharing your journey with it before I tackle it myself. I love a good button up shirt, fitted perfectly of course ;)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Amy - I'm looking forward to perfecting the next version!

      Delete
  4. Do you go to any knitting groups? The Albert Park SnB is in the church foyer next to the petrol station, and meets on the third Sunday of the month from 1-4. It's in the church foyer because one of the members works there - we used to meet in Wool Baa over the road, but the group got to big. You are very welcome to come :-)

    Anne

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Anne, that's so sweet of you! I work every 3rd Sunday, but will see if any weekends match up! Would love a little SnB! :)

      Delete
  5. Wow, I think it is so pretty and it really suits you. The fabric looks lovely to wear. I wasn't seeing any issues until you pointed them out. I know I would leave the neckline as is and perhaps try again on the next one instead. It's certainly very wearable as-is. How do you like the stripe of the fabric with the pattern? It looks very nice to me. I've made this shirt but I shied away from a stripe because I wasn't sure if it would draw attention to all the curved seams and the center back shaping. I made it from a plain chambray and the seams definitely disappear into that. Yours looks so pretty, I'm sure I was over-thinking it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks so much for coming by! The fabric pattern is fine with the shirt, because it's a very fine spot I suppose! Sadly it's starting to split a little on the centra back seam, I just think it must be a bit small from my armpits down! Anyway I'm still wearing it a lot but I don't know I'd make it again. I think obvious stripes might be a bit busy with the seams though - my muslin had fine stripes and wasn't too bad!

      Delete

Post a Comment

Disqus Comments